FiberArts magazine - Contemporary Textile Art and Craft
Fiberart - HomeFiberart - Advertiser InfoFiberart - Contact Us Fiberart - View Cart
Fiberarts - Current Issue Fiberarts - Back Issues Fiberarts - Books Fiberarts - Competitions Fiberarts - Current and Coming Fiberarts - Resources
 

Fiberarts - Winter 2010/2011
Winter 2010/2011

 
Fiberarts - Winter 2010/2011
 
Buy This Issue
 
Contents
Images of Berber Soepboer’s Treasuring Places wearable art collection
Revisit “Made for Love” by Al Paqua, Candiss Cole-Footitt’s debut article from our May/June 1979 issue
Candiss Cole-Footitt’s one-of-a-kind handwoven shibori coat
Updated exhibition and competition listings
Next Issue



The Magic of Handwoven Ikat/Shibori

Driven by a deep passion to create unique textiles and chic designs, Candiss Cole-Footitt’s collections of elegant and durable wearable art pieces are timeless. All of her designs are made at her studio in Sedona, Arizona, with the help of a small dedicated staff, two handweavers, and her loving husband, Rodger Footitt, a master dyer and textile machinery inventor. The story of their inspiring partnership is featured in our Winter 2010/2011 issue on page 42 in the article by Laurie Fagen.

For much of Candiss’s successful thirty-five-year career, she handwove all of her own fabrics. As the business grew, her focus naturally turned more toward the design and production of her garments and the business demands of selling her collections in craft shows throughout the country. But she still revels in those rare times she can find to work on non-production one-of-a-kind pieces such as Moonshadows (2009). This luscious silk long coat was hand-dyed, handwoven, cut, and sewn into the garment, then hand-shiboried with sheep “castration” rings, pie weights, and shibori threads using a technique called kanoko shibori. The piece was then hand-gathered and stitched tightly until every area was touched, also known as nui shibori, which allows for greater control of the pattern.

The result of such careful, time-consuming labor is sheer magic. "I can create movement within my piece,” she says proudly, “and have total control over the way it lays."

To learn more about Candiss Cole Designs and see a listing of upcoming craft shows she will attend, visit www.candisscole.com.

Candiss Cole-Footitt in her Sedona, Arizona, studio. 2010. Photo: Laurie Fagen.

 

Candiss’s one-of-a-kind silk long coat Moonshadows (with detail) made in 2009.

Moonshadows in-progress being hand-shiboried with sheep “castration” rings.

 

Home ~ Current Issue ~ Back Issues ~ Competitions ~ Current & Coming ~ Subscriber Services
Advertiser Info ~ Contact Us

Fiberarts Magazine, 201 E. Fourth St., Loveland, CO 80537
Interweave
Copyright 2010 Interweave Press, LLC.